Finding Relief from PTSD

Unfortunately, trauma is fairly common among Americans — approximately 60% of men and 50% of women experience at least one trauma during their lives. For many, the event(s) can have a long-lasting effect, leading to a psychological disorder known as post-traumatic stress disorder, which is commonly known as PTSD. In fact, about 8 million people in the United States have PTSD at any given time throughout each year.

At the Institute for Advanced Psychiatry, Dr. Diana Ghelber and our team understand the effects that PTSD can have on those who suffer from the disorder, often greatly limiting their abilities to function normally. Thankfully, we offer several effective approaches that can help you move on from your trauma to lead a happy and productive life.

Here’s a look at what PTSD is and how we can help you find relief.

PTSD 101

PTSD has long been associated with veterans of war, even earning the name “shell shock.” While soldiers are certainly more likely to experience trauma than civilians, PTSD can develop in anyone who’s experienced or witnessed trauma, regardless of their age, gender, or race.

While trauma may mean different things to different people, the most common causes of PTSD include:

Of course, not everyone develops PTSD after a trauma, but for those who do, we typically look for symptoms that fall into the following four categories:

The severity of PTSD can range from a mild nuisance to a debilitating condition that forces the person to retreat entirely.

Treating PTSD

After an extensive physical exam and psychological evaluation to determine whether you’re suffering from PTSD, and to what degree, our goal is to help release you from your trauma, which we can do with one or more of the following:

Psychotherapy

Also called talk therapy, this type of psychotherapy gives you the opportunity to process the trauma with us as we discuss the event, the effects it had on your life, and how you can move forward by reframing it.

Medications

If your PTSD is severe, we can explore whether medications may help you with some of the more severe symptoms, such as anxiety and depression.

Ketamine infusion therapy

This therapy uses the drug ketamine to offset treatment-resistant conditions like depression. We administer the therapy in our office and many of our patients experience near-immediate relief from their PTSD symptoms. 

If PTSD has a hold on your life, please contact our office in Fort Worth, Texas, to set up an appointment.

You Might Also Enjoy...

5 Benefits of Therapy After Sexual Assault

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and we want to do our part to add to this very important conversation. Here, we explore the benefits of therapy after sexual assault so that you can take control of your life again.

Postpartum Depression: Can TMS Help?

You wanted a baby, yet, after the birth, you’re not experiencing the joy you anticipated. Know that you’re not alone as one in eight women experiences signs of postpartum depression. Here’s how TMS can help.

Warning Signs You or a Loved One Has OCD

Most of us fixate on something every once in a while, but true obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is something far more serious. Here’s how to spot the warning signs of OCD in yourself or someone close to you.

Everything You Need to Know About Psychogenic Pain

The role that your brain plays when it comes to pain is extensive since it serves as the hub of your central nervous system. This means that not all pain comes from physical damage and often accompanies mental health issues.

Supporting a Loved One With PTSD

The numbers surrounding trauma in both children and adults are high, and it’s likely you or someone you know has been affected. If you have a loved one whose experience led to PTSD, here’s how you can support their journey.